I’ve spent my life reading the comics and these days Tom Tomorrow is at the top of my list – and today’s strip explains why. Who else would think to take the Flight 370 news debacle and turn it into a story, in exactly the same style, on the mysterious disappearance of American democracy? (“The search extends to Washington, D.C., where the Supreme Court just declared that campaign contributions are a form of free speech.” “Here’s a scale model of the Supreme Court for viewers who may be unfamiliar with it.”) Tom 

I’ve spent my life reading the comics and these days Tom Tomorrow is at the top of my list – and today’s strip explains why. Who else would think to take the Flight 370 news debacle and turn it into a story, in exactly the same style, on the mysterious disappearance of American democracy? (“The search extends to Washington, D.C., where the Supreme Court just declared that campaign contributions are a form of free speech.” “Here’s a scale model of the Supreme Court for viewers who may be unfamiliar with it.”) Tom 

 

Here’s an art project to reckon with: artists from around the world have created “Not a Bug Splat” — “bug splat” is the derogatory term the drone community uses for a kill. It’s a giant poster of a boy who died in a drone attacks on display on the ground in northwest Pakistan — literally art for drone operators to see, and according to the artists, it’s also “designed to be captured by satellites in order to make it a permanent part of the landscape on online mapping sites.” All in all, an extraordinary project. Tom 

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crisisgroup:

Apathy and Fear of Taliban Combine to Keep Rural Voters Away From the Polls | Azam Ahmed
While polling centers across Kabul and other Afghan cities were celebrating record turnouts on Saturday, Tahir Khan, a tribal leader in rural Nangarhar Province, experienced a very different Election Day.
“It was a dead zone,” he said, referring to the eastern province’s Shinwar district. “All the polling centers were closed, and people hardly left their homes.”
The truth in Shinwar, and in some other rural areas of southern and eastern Afghanistan where the insurgency is strongest, is that the Taliban did not have to pick up their rifles to disrupt the vote on Saturday.
In some districts that were still nominally open for polling, residents were too frightened about the Taliban’s threat to punish voters, too dubious about the security forces’ ability to protect them or too disenchanted with the national government in general to turn out to vote.
FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)
Photo: Helmand PRT, Lashkar Gah/flickr

crisisgroup:

Apathy and Fear of Taliban Combine to Keep Rural Voters Away From the Polls | Azam Ahmed

While polling centers across Kabul and other Afghan cities were celebrating record turnouts on Saturday, Tahir Khan, a tribal leader in rural Nangarhar Province, experienced a very different Election Day.

“It was a dead zone,” he said, referring to the eastern province’s Shinwar district. “All the polling centers were closed, and people hardly left their homes.”

The truth in Shinwar, and in some other rural areas of southern and eastern Afghanistan where the insurgency is strongest, is that the Taliban did not have to pick up their rifles to disrupt the vote on Saturday.

In some districts that were still nominally open for polling, residents were too frightened about the Taliban’s threat to punish voters, too dubious about the security forces’ ability to protect them or too disenchanted with the national government in general to turn out to vote.

FULL ARTICLE (New York Times)

Photo: Helmand PRT, Lashkar Gah/flickr