humanrightswatch
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Nigeria: Escalating Communal Violence
 Escalating violence across five states in central Nigeria has killed more than 1,000 people since December 2013, Human Rights Watch said today. The failure of Nigerian authorities to investigate the attacks or bring those responsible to justice is likely to exacerbate the cycle of violence in the conflict-prone north central region.Communal violence, stoked by competition between local farming communities and nomadic herdsmen, has plagued this region for many years and is spreading to other states in northern Nigeria.
Adding to the overall tension in the central region, a bomb explosion on April 14, 2014, killed more than 71 people and injured hundreds others in Nyanya, in the Abuja suburbs. The attack, occurring during an early morning peak period and at a usually crowded commuter motor park, appeared aimed at achieving a high casualty rate. Nyanya is in Nasarawa state, one of the states affected by communal violence, though it did not immediately seem to be connected to those conflicts.
Photo: The aftermath of a bomb explosion on April 14 that killed more than 71 people in a bus station near Nigeria’s capital city of Abuja. © 2014 Getty Images

humanrightswatch:

Nigeria: Escalating Communal Violence

 Escalating violence across five states in central Nigeria has killed more than 1,000 people since December 2013, Human Rights Watch said today. The failure of Nigerian authorities to investigate the attacks or bring those responsible to justice is likely to exacerbate the cycle of violence in the conflict-prone north central region.

Communal violence, stoked by competition between local farming communities and nomadic herdsmen, has plagued this region for many years and is spreading to other states in northern Nigeria.

Adding to the overall tension in the central region, a bomb explosion on April 14, 2014, killed more than 71 people and injured hundreds others in Nyanya, in the Abuja suburbs. The attack, occurring during an early morning peak period and at a usually crowded commuter motor park, appeared aimed at achieving a high casualty rate. Nyanya is in Nasarawa state, one of the states affected by communal violence, though it did not immediately seem to be connected to those conflicts.

Photo: The aftermath of a bomb explosion on April 14 that killed more than 71 people in a bus station near Nigeria’s capital city of Abuja. © 2014 Getty Images

I’ve spent my life reading the comics and these days Tom Tomorrow is at the top of my list – and today’s strip explains why. Who else would think to take the Flight 370 news debacle and turn it into a story, in exactly the same style, on the mysterious disappearance of American democracy? (“The search extends to Washington, D.C., where the Supreme Court just declared that campaign contributions are a form of free speech.” “Here’s a scale model of the Supreme Court for viewers who may be unfamiliar with it.”) Tom 

I’ve spent my life reading the comics and these days Tom Tomorrow is at the top of my list – and today’s strip explains why. Who else would think to take the Flight 370 news debacle and turn it into a story, in exactly the same style, on the mysterious disappearance of American democracy? (“The search extends to Washington, D.C., where the Supreme Court just declared that campaign contributions are a form of free speech.” “Here’s a scale model of the Supreme Court for viewers who may be unfamiliar with it.”) Tom 

 

Here’s an art project to reckon with: artists from around the world have created “Not a Bug Splat” — “bug splat” is the derogatory term the drone community uses for a kill. It’s a giant poster of a boy who died in a drone attacks on display on the ground in northwest Pakistan — literally art for drone operators to see, and according to the artists, it’s also “designed to be captured by satellites in order to make it a permanent part of the landscape on online mapping sites.” All in all, an extraordinary project. Tom